Managing Home Horrors The Easy Way

Homeowners everywhere spend a fortune making their homes look beautiful. Sometimes, however, home horrors happen and all of that money and time can be wasted. It’s time to check your home insurance policies, roll up your sleeves, and deal with the nasties that might be lurking in your house:

 

Mold And Mildew

Mold and mildew can be more harmful than you think. Breathing in the spores that can be released into the air can cause chest infections and complications if your health is already poor. Not all mildew or mold is easy to spot. The most obvious signs of a problem are those black, gray and brown stains in the corners, or around the bathroom tiles. Pink mold can also be lurking in your tub and around your taps. Nasty stuff! Steam is the safest approach to killing it, although bleach will whiten the stain again.

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To prevent these nasties turning up, check your guttering when it rains. If it’s overflowing or leaking onto your brickwork, damp can penetrate your home resulting in mold. It can also erode the bricks over time, so it should be fixed straight away. Use your extractor fans in the kitchen and bathroom every time you run the hot tap or boil water. You can use a hygrometer to check your interior humidity levels are kept low.

 

Pests

Insects, termites, rats, and mice can all be lurking in large numbers in your home. You might never see them, but chances are you’ll hear them. You might smell them as well. Unfortunately, these little critters don’t live for long. If they die in your property, the stench could become overwhelming. Finding them is tough if they’re between the walls or under the floors. You should find the best exterminators you can to deal with this kind of situation.

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To reduce the risk of infestation, make sure any wood treatments for your home are up to date. Block external holes and gaps to stop them getting in. Always vacuum up crumbles as soon as possible so you can cut off their food source. Finally, try a sonic deterrent. You won’t be able to hear it but the little blighters will hate to go anywhere near them.

 

Leaks

Not only could leaks lead to the mold and mildew we don’t want, but it could damage the home too. Holes in the roof can easily let rain in. This will then drip down onto ceilings and perhaps run across them to more vulnerable points. Over time, the water saturation will cause substantial damage to the plaster, wood, and even the brick work. The last thing you want is for the ceiling to fall down or your brand new basement renovation to flood.

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Other leaks can come from damaged pipework or drippy taps. Not only does the noise drive you mad, but the cost of all that lost water can soon add up. Finding a leak isn’t always easy. If you’re seeing a lot of water coming in, it’s time to turn off the supply at the mains and get a plumber to permanently fix the problem. Try a dehumidifier to help you dry the place out again.

5 Simple DIY Steps To Stop Losing Warmth From Your Home

If you live in an older home or perhaps a new home without proper insulation, the cold can seep into your home and make shivering every time you walk through the front door commonplace. When winter arrives, the shock of the chill will be even more profound, and thus a battle will start off trying to keep as much heat in as possible and forcing the cold to stay out. Energy efficient walls have insulation inside them, whether it be foam or sponge filling. However not all homes have them, and if your home was not built with them included in the regulations for building, it could be quite expensive to buy insulation. However, even still it may not always be the walls, as the issue of keeping warmth in your home is all encompassing.

Protecting from the wind

Blocking out the wind is how you keep the chill from entering your home. House structures are more than just walls; they have doors, windows, keyhole, vents and air leaks that all have the ability to crack, widen and eventually let moisture and the wind into the home. Check for any leaks around doors and window; you will see little cracks around the edges. If you find any, buy laminate sealant and with a filling knife, gently fill them in. For a cheap remedy, your curtains can come in handy. Pick up and put the curtain on the windowsill, push it into the corner and pat them snugly against the sides.

Credit – Michael Rieger

A once over

Sometimes the little home improvements will only be able to help short-term. Nip it in the bud, and do a proper clean sweep of your home from top to bottom. By calling out an expert home inspector, a wide array of aspects such as an examination of the exterior condition, the structural integrity, electrical and heating systems, the plumbing and insulation along with ventilation will be studied, and a report will be compiled. Some inspectors will have with them the ability to seek out the mold and moist spots with the aid of an infrared camera. By catching these spots, the quality of air around the home can be improved, and this helps children with asthma greatly.

 

Don’t be careless

It goes without saying but not just for a slimmer heating bill, letting the heat out of your home carelessly is asking for trouble. Close any doors, windows or patio doors whenever you leave the home, even it’s just to go in the garden momentarily. Don’t open the bathroom window to let the steam out, but keep the room door open so the heat transfers elsewhere. Rather than venting heat and the smell of cooking in the kitchen, keep it indoors by letting it waft throughout the home. Be frugal, and diligent, capturing heat is a game of consistency.

Source – Wonderlane

The sofa arrangement

It might seem simple enough, but moving the sofa in a more strategic position can keep you warmer. The living room is where most people spend their time in the home. Locate your heater, and move your sofa closer to it and preferably, in a position that it is either in front of you or to your side. Additionally, if you have a fireplace, move your sofa closer to it without causing a hazard risk. The home is constantly fighting against the cooler temperatures, and realistically, this is only a human concept. The aim is for you to keep warm, not the house itself, so think what you can do to keep your body temperature stable.

Don’t be careless

It goes without saying but not just for a slimmer heating bill, letting the heat out of your home carelessly is asking for trouble. Close any doors, windows or patio doors whenever you leave the home, even it’s just to go in the garden momentarily. Don’t open the bathroom window to let the steam out, but keep the room door open so the heat transfers elsewhere. Rather than venting heat and the smell of cooking in the kitchen, keep it indoors by letting it waft throughout the home. Be frugal, and diligent, capturing heat is a game of consistency.