Giving Your Child The Extra Help They Might Need

Image

As parents, from a pride perspective it’s easy to get caught up with what you think your child should be doing, should know and the skills we think they should have. But each child is an individual, they learn at their own pace and we have to accept that and encourage them if they’re doing their best. However, if you’ve noticed that your child is falling behind, struggling and needs a boost, here are some of the ways you can help them. 

 

Have any problems properly diagnosed

If your child has any kind of mental health, learning or physical condition then this is likely to impact their lives in some way. Getting to the bottom of the problem and having it properly diagnosed can be really helpful, that way they can get the assistance and any additional help and resources they might need. Take dyslexia for example, this can make reading and keeping up with classmates incredibly difficult for a child. But with a diagnosis, they can be given extra help from teachers, be shown software and given additional help that perhaps teaches them in a different way and allows them to stay on track. Get yourself some books for dyslexia or whatever condition you’re dealing with and read up yourself as well, the better you understand what’s going on, the better position you’re in to either help or find the right help for your child. 

 

Hire a tutor

Kids don’t need to be struggling with a condition to fall behind with school work, there are lots of reasons they might do so. Not all children will learn subjects at the same pace, and yours might struggle with things here and there even if the rest of their schoolwork is good. Hiring a tutor can be a way to overcome the issues that crop up here and there, having someone else explain things in a slightly different way, one on one might just be what’s needed for it to click in their mind. There are plenty of tutors out there that work freelance and will be able to come to your home so scheduling in a little extra study is quick and hassle free- have a look online and see who is available in your area. 

 

Build skills outside of the classroom

Schools teach our kids so much, but there are lots of skills we’ll need to build or at least build upon as parents. Learning outside of the classroom can be a lot of fun, and generally gives your child more life experience and understanding to build upon which can be useful when it comes to their studies. Take them to the farm or zoo to teach them about animals, or a museum or religious building to teach about culture, history or religion. Go camping or spend time outdoors to build practical skills, or travel to new places so they can experience completely new things for themselves without just seeing them in books or on tv. Skills like cooking, cleaning and budgeting money are things you can start teaching about when kids are young and build up over the years.

Top 15 Things Your Child Should Know Before Entering Kindergarten Free printable packet!

   

Be able to state first and last name when asked.
Be able to write first name with first letter uppercase and remaining letters lower case.
Use appropriate three-finger grasp when using writing instruments (pencils, crayons, and scissors)
Count to at least thirty and tells what number comes before or after a given number to 20.
Know all the letters in their first name.
Identify basic geometric shapes (triangle, circle, square, rectangle, oval, star, rhombus (diamond) and heart)
Know basic colors (red, blue, green, yellow, orange, purple, black, white, brown, pink)
Identify numerals 1-10 in random order.
Make most letter/sound matches.
Identify most upper and lower case letters.
Use finger to accurately touch count items to ten.
Knows concepts of print (front and back of the book, which page comes first, track words left to right).
Be able to rhyme words.
Retells simple stories in sequence.
When given a word (“man”) and a new beginning sound (/f/), creates the familiar word (“fan”)
Socially Your child should be able to…
Adjust own clothing before and after using the restroom.
Use restroom independently including washing hands without a reminder.
Take off and put on outer clothing
Sit for a story for 5-10 minutes
Clean up after themselves
Shares materials and toys with other children.
Attend kindergarten with a positive attitude
Be confident and ready to separate from the parent.
Be able to listen and follow 2-3 step directions.
Be able to solve problems without aggression.

Help Prepare Your Child by…

Going to interesting places such as the beach, park, zoo, airport, farm or lake. (Example: Use car rides to play I Spy, this encourages children to identify shapes, colors and helps develop their vocabulary in fun ways.)
Encourage your children to observe and talk about their experiences, as conversations with adults who care enrich a child’s vocabulary and understanding of the world.
Make eye contact with your child while listening to them speak, showing them that you value what they say.
Expose your child to many kinds of literature by reading to them daily.
Praise and encourage your child’s efforts and curiosity, knowing that from mistakes come learning and confidence. Criticism can discourage children from trying new things and lower self-confidence.

Here is a great free printable packet to help your little one get ready for that first day!