5 Questions to Ask About Disability Finance

Image Credit: Gerd Altmann

 

Confused about disability finance? Worried about disability lawyers? Try our mini-guide to disability finance, to help clear things up.

 

1. Am I eligible for benefits?

 

It’s straightforward to figure out if you’re eligible for any support from Social Security, and if so, which kinds. You can try the handy tool here to see how much support you could claim. You can also ring their hotlines for advice, or get impartial advice in your community, for example, at a legal clinic. A good lawyer or disability attorney can also advise you on disability benefits.

 

2. What about insurance?

 

Disability insurance is something anyone can purchase. It works like any other insurance policy you have, like dental or auto. Some employers will offer you disability insurance as part of their benefits package, but if they don’t and you want it, you can set it up privately. It’s designed to cover you if you become disabled (short-term or long-term), and can no longer work. Elite packages are available if, for example, you’re an athlete or footballer — anyone with a job depending entirely on their physical status.

 

3. What will disability insurance do for me?

 

Usually, you’ll get a percentage of your monthly income paid out to you by the insurance company. Most companies offer this monthly. You may also get rehabilitation services and possibly return-to-work incentives (which may be financial). If you’d like rehabilitation or other aspects of your disability insurance, make sure this is included in your policy before you agree to anything. If in doubt, ask an attorney to look over your policy for you before you’ve committed to it.

 

4. What kinds of disability insurance are there?

 

SSDI: This is sometimes known as disability benefits. Whether you get it or not can depend on how much you’ve paid into SSDI, how many work credits you have, and the state of your disability. 

 

State: Some states have made a certain level of employer-sponsored disability insurance, mandatory. This means your employer will have to offer you some disability insurance, but it depends where you live. 

 

Private: This is where you take out an insurance policy yourself, which you pay for. It is designed similarly to any other insurance policy. If you become unable to work, your insurer should pay out a percentage of your wages.

 

5. What about disability lawyers?

 

Most disability lawyers work on things like denied claims, especially of disability insurance claims. Disability law requires a specialized disability lawyer due to the continually changing laws around disability. A personal injury lawyer is a very different type of lawyer and will not have the right skills. Be wary of hiring the wrong type by accident. If the lawyer you’re hiring exclusively deals with disability insurance cases, they will be experts in navigating that field, and you’re sure to be in the best hands.

 

The world of disability finance is ever-changing and can be very confusing. Make sure to get all the advice you need from reputable sources before entering into any legal agreements or financial commitments. 

Babies Behind Bars And The Mistakes Their Parents Make

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As a proud teen parent, the chances are that you spend most of your time thinking about how you can help your baby prepare for adulthood. Sadly, as the tumultuous teen years get underway, many parents find that things don’t quite go according to plan. 

 

Psychologically, these are years throughout which your teen is going to test the boundaries. Some manage to do so with little more than a few years on the wild side but, for those who get in with the wrong crowd, it isn’t often long until the police get involved.

 

This is distressing for everyone, not least you who are stuck at home having nightmares about what your youngster could be getting up to. And, if you’re unlucky, those nightmares will come true with a call that your teen has been arrested. 

 

Sadly, an astounding 2.1 million youths under the age of eighteen are arrested in the US annually. Still, the majority of parents don’t have a clue what to do if that dreaded phone call comes through, and many of them make mistakes that could harm, rather than help, their teen’s chances of release. To make sure you avoid doing the same, keep reading to find out what you definitely shouldn’t do if the police take your teen into custody.

 

Rushing to the station

 

Your first instinct will be to rush to the station and sit on those police interviews with your baby. But, let’s face it; you’re not a legal expert. While you may assume your defense is the only one your teen needs, that’s far from the truth. Instead, you should seek expert legal defense as found from firms like Wasatch Defense Lawyers before you even think about heading to the station. This way, your teen has a specialist on their side from day one, making it far less likely that their arrest will lead to a conviction.

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Assuming guilt

 

If you’re having difficulty with your teen, you may assume that they’re guilty of whatever crime. Your assumption alone can do significant damage to both their mentality and police outlooks. Instead, remember that teens are arrested for all kinds of misunderstandings, including being in the wrong place. With that in mind, you should always assume the best, and go in there believing that your child is innocent so that everyone else believes it, too. 

 

Letting police stay in the room while you talk

 

Lastly, you’ll want to talk to your teen when you arrive, and you’re well within your rights to do so. Note, though, that this should be a private conversation. If you let the police listen, they may record or otherwise take incriminating notes. Instead, insist on a private audience and get the full story from your teen so you’re in the best position to help. 

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Arrests are any parent’s nightmare but, as the states show, they do happen. The only thing for it is, therefore, to avoid these mistakes, and instead do whatever you can to get them back home safe and sound.

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