Bathtub vs Shower: Which Is Better For Your Home?

You’ve bagged your dream home in the best location possible. It’s close to the local schools, there are plenty of shops nearby, and it didn’t cost a fortune. There’s still room for improvement, particularly in the bathroom. You want to complete a full renovation, but you’re stumped by one conundrum. Should you install a bathtub or a shower in your home? Which one would be better? Let’s put them up against one another to see who comes out on top:

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Showers take up less space

A big advantage of a shower is that it doesn’t need to take up much space. You can have a small cubicle that leaves more room in your bathroom. The extra space could be used for storage, which will help keep your bathroom neat and tidy. Or, you can leave it as it is, making your bathroom feel much bigger. 

 

Baths are more relaxing

You can’t deny that lying in a bubble bath is far more relaxing than standing up in a shower. After a long day of work, who wants to stand up and scrub themselves? You want to lie down and relax! To be honest, you could get the best of both worlds and install a show in your bath. It doesn’t avoid the problem mentioned above – in fact, a bath/shower combo probably takes up even more space. 

 

Showers are more convenient

Sure, relaxing in a bath is great, but what happens in the morning? What about those times where you need to get ready ASAP? You can’t afford to wait for a bath to fill up, you need to wash right this second! In scenarios like this, a shower will always come out on top. You hop in, turn it on, wash, then get out. It’s that simple, and I bet you could complete your entire shower before a bath even fills up. 

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Baths create less mess

Unless you’re splashing around like a dolphin, a bath won’t create anywhere near as much mess as a shower. The problem is that water from the shower will always spray on the walls. From here, you genuinely end up with water damage over time. If you have tiles, you get mould in the grouting. But, if water gets on un-tiled surfaces, it can linger and cause damp. Then, you’re online looking for water damage restoration companies to try and fix your bathroom wall. With a bath, all of the water is contained in the tub. It doesn’t splash on the walls, so this isn’t an issue. 

 

Who wins?

How big is your bathroom? Are you willing to take up space with a bathtub? If you are, then the obvious choice is to install a bath with a shower attached to it. This way, you truly get the best of both worlds – but it all depends on if you have enough space. If you don’t, then a shower is the obvious answer. Realistically, there’s no reason to only have a bath in your home. Yes, it can be relaxing, but is that a good enough reason to spend money on one? You definitely need a shower, and whether or not this comes with a bath is up to you. 

10 Ways To Lower Your Water Bills

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Just been hit by an expensive water bill? While other utilities can often cost us more overall, water is an expense that can still have a tendency of sneaking up on people (especially given that many of us pay it in annual or bi-annual installments).

Fortunately, water bills are one of the easiest utility bills to reduce. It’s largely a case of reducing your water consumption in and around the home. Here are just several ways in which you may be able to spend less on water.

Fix any leaks

A leak could have a significant impact on your water bill. This could be anything from a dripping tap to a corroded pipe to a damaged seal on a washing machine.

Most leaks are easy to pinpoint – it could be a simple case of following the dripping sound or looking out for water damage. In other cases, a leak may require a bit of detective work to solve. A plumber should be able to help you find the source. Indications that there may be a leak besides unusually high water bills include unexplained damp, unexplained trickling sounds or low water pressure.

Upgrade old plumbing fixtures

You may also be able to reduce your water consumption by upgrading any old water guzzling fixtures. Old toilets, old washing machines and old showers could all be worth replacing.

Sites like Plumbers Stock sell modern toilets and showers that can help you to save water. You can meanwhile shop at appliance stores for energy-efficient washing machines. While buying new fixtures isn’t cheap, you’ll likely save money in the long run. This could be particularly the case if old fixtures are already starting to leak.

Don’t leave the tap running

Do you leave the tap running while brushing your teeth? Or do you leave it running while doing the washing up? If so, you could be wasting unnecessary water.

You only need to run a tap while rinsing your brush. As for doing the washing up, it’s much more economical to fill a bowl with water and wash all your utensils in this bowl rather than to wash each utensil under a running tap. This can be a hard habit to kick, but could save you some money.

Buy a dishwasher

On average, most people use up more water when washing dishes by hand than they do when using a dishwasher. As a result, these appliances can be worthy investments.

A decent dishwasher should be able to clean all its contents with one cycle. Some machines have economy settings, but these may not always provide a thorough clean. You can find guides at sites like Expert Reviews that list the best dishwashers on the market.

Certain utensils such as pots and pans may still benefit from being soaked in hot water to get rid of tough food debri. It’s best to leave pans to soak immediately after cooking so that food has less of a chance to harden up.

Wash full loads

In order to reduce water consumed by your washing machine, make sure that each load is full. If you’re only washing half loads, you’ll be having to use your washing machine twice as much to get through all your laundry.

Don’t worry too much about separating colors – it’s a good idea to separate whites and to be careful with new clothes (they’re more likely to run), but otherwise most colors won’t affect each other.

It is possible to overload a washing machine, but generally this involves stuffing it until nothing else will fit. Fill up the drum, but don’t try to squeeze clothes into it like a suitcase.

Shower more, bath less

You can also save water by taking less baths and more showers. The average person uses 30 gallons when filling a bathtub, while the average 10 minute shower uses up no more than 20 gallons.

If you prefer longer showers, then baths may be more economical. However, for most people showering uses up less water.

Avoid ironing

If you do a lot of ironing, you could be consuming water every time you fill it up (although admittedly not a lot in the grand scheme of things). Ironing isn’t always necessary – if you hang up clothing to dry immediately after washing, you can usually prevent most creases from setting in. Besides, ironing is a chore that most people don’t want to do anyway. So why do it?

Use your vegetable water

Most of us chuck away the excess water when boiling or steaming vegetables, however there are times when it could be reused. Vegetable water makes a great base for broth and it can even be used to cook pasta in straight after, helping to add flavor.

There’s also the option of letting it get cold and using it to water plants with – it will be full of nutrients that could benefit your shrubs.

Harvest rainwater

When it comes to watering your lawn and plants, you can save a lot of money on water by harvesting rainwater. While you shouldn’t drink rainwater without purifying it first, it can be ideal for watering plants with and will save you using your mains water supply.

You can collect water by using a rain barrel. Many of these have taps attached from which you can fit a hose or simply fill up a watering can.

Consider recycling greywater

It’s possible to re-use waste water from your taps and shower for toilet flushing. This could help to save you a lot of water and a lot of money. Fitting a greywater recycling system isn’t cheap so this is definitely a long-term investment, but one that could be well worth looking into if you plan to stay in your home for the foreseeable future.