Strange Noises In Your Home That You Shouldn’t Ignore

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Is your home making strange noises? Odd sounds could be signs of problems that require an urgent fix. Below are just a few strange noises to be wary of.

Drip! Drip! Drip!

A dripping sound indoors is never good. It’s possible that it could be a leaky tap or a broken pipe – by calling the help of plumbers you can get this easily fixed. Alternatively, it could be the sound of rainwater leaking in somewhere. You could have a crack in your roof or in a wall that needs sealing. If you hear the dripping but don’t see it, you could even find that it’s happening within the walls. A leak detection specialist may be able to find it.

Whistling windows

Is your window creating a whistling sound? It’s likely the sound of the wind coming through. Windows that are closed shouldn’t be letting in wind and you could find that the window isn’t fitted properly. A window installation company may be able to help solve the problem.

Buzzing outlets

Buzzing sounds coming from electrical outlets are definitely not a good sign. Wiring may be loose and it could pose a fire risk. If you notice this sound, it’s worth hiring an electrician immediately to take a look.

Scratching in the walls

Scratching in the walls is an alarming sound. It’s almost always caused by rodents – there could be rats or mice living within the walls. Rodents are most common in older properties. A pest control service may be able to take a look and help get rid of the infestation. Occasionally, scratching sounds may be caused by birds or bats that have got into a cavity wall or attic – something that a pest control service may also be able to solve.

Bubbling in pipes

Gurgling plumbing could be the result of a blockage in your pipes. Boilers and radiators can also produce gurgling sounds, which could be the result of trapped air or sediment. You can bleed radiators yourself to stop the bubbling sounds – however most other bubbling sounds will usually require the help of a plumber.

Banging in pipes

Banging sounds in pipes are usually caused by water hammer. Pipes usually have air chambers in them to help prevent water slamming against the valves after turning off a faucet. It’s possible that these air chambers could be filled with water. You can fix this by shutting off the water supply and draining all the taps in your home to help allow air to refill these chambers.

Strange furnace noises

If your home furnace is making banging, squealing or hissing sounds, it could be a sign of a problem. Loud booms and rattles are the most serious sounds – if you hear these noises, you should call a professional immediately, as it could be a delayed ignition or a carbon monoxide problem. Unusual clicking, buzzing or whistling sounds are usually not as serious, but should still be checked out. Annual furnace maintenance could prevent such problems from occurring in the future.

3 Home Problems Worth Treating As Emergencies

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When maintaining our homes, oftentimes we can put off essential work until a date in which applying the remedy would be more convenient. For example, if the paint is starting to peel from your garage door, it’s understandable why you wouldn’t break out the stripping knife and paints ten minutes before you pick your children up from school.

 

However, there are some issues that if left untended, or not regularly inspected, can grow quite significantly. This can sometimes lead to work that takes much more time and requires much more expense to fully resolve.

 

Yet for those of us who aren’t experts in all matters of DIY or home construction, distinguishing one from the other can seem like a difficult task. For instance, a broken window can be boarded up initially, but how long should we leave it like this until we are truly harming the security or insulation of our home to a worrying point? Is it worth calling out that emergency number and not waiting until the weekend is over?

 

In this post, we hope to give you three examples that can aid your understanding with these matters:

 

Roof Leaks Or Faded Insulation

 

If you notice a roof leak, or feel that your insulation is damaged or ineffective, it’s important to have those two issues sorted out pronto. Of course, the first of these examples is quite obvious to see, but the second can also contribute to the first, or rather open you up to the problem after one minute of heavy rainfall. With the best attic insulation https://www.insulatekansascity.com/attic-insulation/ from Insulatek, you’re sure to have the materials necessary for resolving the problem.

 

Damp

 

Damp is not just a somewhat unattractive spread of mold on the ceiling. It can be a dangerous presence of moisture that grows both toxins and spores. This can harm the lungs of those who breathe this in, especially the elderly or newborn babies. Damp often has a particular scent, but it can sometimes be hard to detect before it becomes a real problem. This means inspecting your bathroom, your walls (behind the furniture) of every room in the house, and especially in your basement will help you find it more quickly. Furthermore, be sure to properly ventilate your home for good measure.

 

Wall Cracks

 

Wall cracks can emphasize or declare subsidence, and this can mean that the foundations are starting to lose their structural integrity, are moving, or perhaps the walls are losing their structural strength. This can be a real hazard, so it’s important to move away from that room if you can, and speak to professional construction services. Sometimes, this can denote intensive construction work as repair, and so it’s important to speak to your insurance providers to see what your options are. Yet it’s always better to incur expense than to avoid a very dangerous home situation.

 

With this advice, we hope you can take care of the 3 home problems worth treating as emergencies.

Calling All Homeowners – Here’s What To Do With A Windowless Room

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A windowless room. Bare walls. Cold interiors.

 

The thought is enough to send a shiver down your spine. For homeowners, the mortal sin is to create an environment that isn’t warm and cozy. As a rule, you need windows because they incorporate light perfectly. So, a windowless room is hard to optimize and may be your least favorite space in your home. 

 

Still, there’s no need to panic and treat it as if it’s a leper. Yes, turning it into a welcoming area is challenging, but it isn’t impossible. There are several ways to bring the feel and style from the rest of your home to a windowless space. Missing the natural light and openness should be the push you need to tackle the problem head-on.

 

Whether you’re going to make a tweak or a significant change, you have lots of options at your disposal. Here are five of them for your information.

 

#1: Simulate Windows

 

Have you ever heard the phrase “fake it until you make it”? In this case, it’s all about bending the rules of interior design to your will. Faux windows may not sound familiar, but you’ve come across them before – they’re called mirrors. Yes, a humble piece of glass is an excellent way to simulate the effect of a window.

 

The way a mirror reflects what light is in the room means that it provides an optical illusion. Suddenly, because the sun’s rays are everywhere, the room appears brighter and airier. The effect also has the bonus of making small spaces look bigger, which is great if you’re home is on the short side.

 

Size matters with mirrors, so it’s essential to consider the ceiling. A low roof requires a large mirror to distract from the ceiling line. The opposite is true of high ceilings and means you can use more mirrors to enhance the effect.

 

#2: Add Doors

 

Just because the room is windowless doesn’t mean it has to be door-less, too. And, if it has doors, you may need to change them so that they don’t block the light from the surrounding spaces. According to Mr. Rogers, French doors are perfect for letting warm light shine through because they incorporate glass and swing inwards. 

 

The fact that they are flexible means you can use French doors in a variety of ways. Opening them, for example, will instantly transform the room by adding a sense of fluidity. However, keep them closed and light should stream through the large glass windows. All you need to do is ensure you don’t block them with furniture or accessories. You can also use ambient lighting to your advantage.

 

Ambient light fixtures from outside will flood into the room, but inside ones will reflect off the glass of the French doors. The result? It will appear as if your windowless room is continuously swathed in the sunshine.

 

#3: Paint The Walls And Ceiling The Same Color

 

To make use of the light, you could be tempted to paint the walls and ceiling different shades. By doing this, you can have two bright light sources. Although it does make sense, it’s also a bad move. The reason is straightforward: the different hues make the room’s lines sharper. As a result, the edges become the focal points.

 

The last thing you want to do is draw attention to the fact that there aren’t any windows in the space. Therefore, it’s better to make the area where the walls and ceiling meet less conspicuous by painting it the same color. If you don’t know which one to choose, remember that you can never go wrong with a shade of white in a windowless room.

 

It’s basic, but the light nature of this hue helps it to reflect light more effectively. A pale shade of blue also works if you are desperate to avoid vanilla interiors.

 

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#4: Hide Light Fixtures

 

Light fixtures are always going to play a significant role in decorating or renovating a windowless room. They may not be an original source of light, yet they mimic it perfectly. The problem you want to avoid is tackiness. Adding too many fittings and fixtures can give the impression you’re trying too hard. Or, they will cause the room to appear cluttered and messy, which is the worst possible result.

 

With that in mind, it’s essential to hide ambient lighting so that it doesn’t stand out. Of course, you still need the rays to shine through, or else there is no effect. A fantastic place to start is the ceiling. Spotlights are popular because they use hard-to-reach space without losing their effectiveness. A mere turn of a dial will enable you to control how much light you want in the room at a given time.

 

Placing them between beams or behind bookcases is another excellent option. When you do this, the light appears more natural as it is an indirect glow. This is the type of light that comes in from a nearby window.

 

#5: Use Interior Windows

 

No, they aren’t mirrors this time. An interior window is a window that you add to the structure of a room. They aren’t traditional windows that separate the outside from the inside of your home, yet they are useful. Why? It’s because they break up parts of the room that block what little light there is from hitting the corners of the space.

 

A transom is a brilliant place to begin. According to Study, the definition of a transom is: “the horizontal structural beam that crosses over a door, and which specifically separates the door frame from a window directly above it.” It’s probably a piece of architecture you haven’t heard about or bothered with before, but it may be the answer to your windowless prayers.

 

All you have to do is find the transom line and place windows above it. The material can be transparent or translucent – it doesn’t matter as long as it isn’t opaque.

 

What are your windowless room go-to’s? How do you ensure it’s bright and airy?