How To Rent With Pets

Finding a new home to rent is stressful enough, but for pet owners, it can be even more of a challenge. Many landlords don’t allow pets, so finding somewhere for you and your fur babies to live is often difficult. 

Image from Pixabay

 

Don’t Be Afraid To Ask

Many landlords have a different idea of what ‘pet’ means so even if a listing says no pets, it can be worth asking the question anyway. Many landlords mean no cats or dogs, but would have no issue with a pet like a gerbil or a budgie. If you are a cat or dog owner, ask anyway and offer to provide a reference from your current landlord or to pay a larger deposit in case of damage caused by the pet. You may be surprised by how many landlords are willing to compromise. 

 

Look around for pet friendly rentals. Using resources like this local report from ABODO to find pricing for pet-friendly rentals can be a huge help. Be prepared to provide information about your pet’s health and behavior. Knowing you have a well-trained small Yorkshire Terrier with up to date vaccinations, for example, may put your letting agent at ease when they’re picturing a huge, unruly Great Dane. 

Image from Pixabay

 

Take Precautions

If you’ve found a pet friendly rental, make sure you set up any needed precautions to minimise possible pet damage. You may need this landlord in the future for a pet reference so make sure you take the care required. This might be covering up carpets in an area where the pet will regularly be kept, or adding baby gates to keep pets out of any banned parts of the house. 

 

If the landlord leaves any furniture, move out of pet reach if you’re concerned about scratching so it’s only your belongings that take the hit. 

Image from Pixabay

 

Make Any Repairs

If your pet does cause any damage, deal with it yourself as soon as possible. This could be as simple as repainting a wall before you move out, or as major as offering to cover the costs of things like carpet replacement if there’s been more serious damage. Being honest and immediately explaining how you’re going to fix it is likely to go down much better with your landlord than if you’ve tried to cover it up, or move out without mentioning your furry friend tore up the living room carpet. 

 

Where possible, make sure your pet is properly trained. Teach your cat to use a scratching post, and not the wall. Make sure your dog knows if it isn’t allowed upstairs, and make sure any indoor pet is properly house-trained. 

Image from Pixabay

 

While it’s always going to be more difficult, finding a suitable rental for you and the furry members of the family isn’t impossible. Persevere, keep looking and keep asking questions until you find the right landlord or letting agent. When you find them, treat their property with respect so they keep allowing pet owners to live there, and give you a good reference to help you find your next home.

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